Christianity and Mental Health: Truth and Transparency

It seems fitting to start this blog on the premise of honesty and transparency. Those things are, after all, what God desires from each of us. We often forget that even though God DESIRES these things from us, the reality is that He does not NEED them. He is the one that already knows us better than we know ourselves. He does not require honesty and transparency to help Him understand us, but He will do powerful things when they are at the forefront of our lives – every part.

Even more so, honesty and transparency are the only things that will break down the walls that hide the uncomfortable topics of mental health and Christianity.

I am convinced, now more than ever, that the church is called to make a herculean effort to understand and embrace mental health issues.

We live in a world that is increasingly difficult for people to navigate. Stress and anxiety are no longer the exceptions, but the rule. Addiction and drug use are rampantly overwhelming in our society leading to unprecedented mental health issues. We, as Christians, are far from exempt from these and a multitude of other mental health struggles. Although the church is increasingly willing to acknowledge that they exist, there is still stigma associated with mental health issues.

I could spew out a number of statistics to support these things, but research is not even necessary to see what is so apparent. There is a time and a place for such information and that will be provided in further posts, but this is just the beginning of our journey – a journey that should be based on honesty and transparency.

I will be the first to admit that being honest and transparent about mental health issues is no easy task. I am one of “those” Christians who suffer from what the world calls “mental” illness. I call it a brain illness, because that IS what I have; a brain that is not well.

My brain has a chronic and lifelong illness called Bipolar Disorder. It is not a simple task for me to write those two words – Bipolar Disorder – with the knowledge that from this point forward they will be attached to my name in a public forum. I know that there will be repercussions, some apparent and some lesser so, from my putting that information out there. However, the significance of being honest and transparent would be lost if I were not so myself.

Openly and honestly sharing that I am a Christian with a brain illness labeled Bipolar Disorder is the best way I know to open the door for the flood of issues related to mental health and Christianity that exist. In this place of complete transparency, I know that there is power – not my own, but God’s.

What more could we ask for when grappling with such difficult and controversial topics? Who, but God, would be a better partner in helping us understand and learn how to reach the hurting?


Raised in the Midwest, Molly Messer discovered writing as a way of coping with a tumultuous life resulting from an unstable family, sexual abuse and assault, trauma, and a genetic predisposition to mental illness. Molly has had extensive technical writing experience in the environmental field. However, her passion is to share relatable stories and information in ways that encourage and inspire others. Her insatiable desire to learn and teach combined with transparency and deep compassion for others, enables her to reach out in unique ways through the written word. She started her first blog in 2012 (www.godmycomfort.wordpress.com) with the desire to find joy in the midst of sorrow after her father’s diagnosis of terminal cancer. She recently started to write blogs for The Clinical Christian delving into the challenges of mental illness and stigma related to mental health both inside and outside the church.


Molly Messer

Raised in the Midwest, Molly Messer discovered writing as a way of coping with a tumultuous life resulting from an unstable family, sexual abuse and assault, trauma, and a genetic predisposition to mental illness. Molly has had extensive technical writing experience in the environmental field. However, her passion is to share relatable stories and information in ways that encourage and inspire others. Her insatiable desire to learn and teach combined with transparency and deep compassion for others, enables her to reach out in unique ways through the written word. She started her first blog in 2012 (www.godmycomfort.wordpress.com) with the desire to find joy in the midst of sorrow after her father’s diagnosis of terminal cancer. She recently started to write blogs for The Clinical Christian delving into the challenges of mental illness and stigma related to mental health both inside and outside the church.


Comments (2)

  • Thanks for your honest and open sharing. As a church professional and one who knows many people struggling with Bipolar Disorder, it is important to find ways that the Christian community can learn more and be agents of healing and hope rather than judgment and fear.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

9 + seventeen =

Contact