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How can we learn to tell the truth as we know it and do this with love? Join Dr. Paul Meier, Kristin Walker, and Melanie Vann as they discuss speaking the truth in love.

SPEAKING THE TRUTH IN LOVE

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
WHENEVER TWO PEOPLE MEET THERE ARE ACTUALLY SIX PEOPLE PRESENT–THE TWO AS THEY SEE THEMSELVES, THE TWO AS THEY SEE EACH OTHER, AND THE TWO AS THEY REALLY ARE, AND ALL SIX ARE DIFFERENT. WHO WE REALLY ARE DEEP DOWN INSIDE IS A MYSTERY EVEN TO US, SO FINDING OUT THE TRUTH ABOUT OURSELVES OR OUR LOVED ONES IS A LIFELONG PROCESS
WHO DO YOU SPEAK THE TRUTH TO AND WHEN IS IT BEST TO KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT?
TO OTHERS–WHAT WOULD JESUS DO OR SAY TO THAT PARTICULAR “OTHER” UNDER THE SAME CIRCUMSTANCES?
HOW MANY PEOPLE TODAY HAVE EVEN ONE CLOSE FRIEND THEY CAN TELL ALL THEIR SECRETS TO?
BEING CAREFUL WHO YOU SHARE THE TRUTH WITH
TO OURSELVES
PROMISING TO BE OUR OWN BEST FRIEND
WHAT WOULD DO OR SAY TO OUR BEST FRIEND UNDER THE SAME CIRCUMSTANCES?

Dr. Paul Meier is the founder of the multi-state, non-profit mental health outpatient organization Meier Clinics, a practicing psychiatrist, best-selling author, and international speaker.

Melanie Vann has her MA in Counseling Psychology. She is the Program Director for MHNR Network and host of Memoirs of Madness.

Kristin Sunanta Walker is the founder of MHNR Network and host of Mental Health News Radio.

www.meierclinics.com
www.mhnrnetwork.com

Mental Health Perspectives with Dr. John Huber & Kristin Walker hosted by Ryan McCormick.

Poor envy. It has such a bad reputation.

Who among us enjoys looking miserable, mediocre, hostile — and petty, just because we see someone who has something that we desire?

Lately, envy is in the air, as our country struggles with how to react to the increasing concentration of wealth in a smaller percentage of the population.

In a recent opinion piece, Arthur Brooks, President of the American Enterprise Institute, offers a provocative take on envy’s role in our reactions.

His main points are that:

1. envy makes us unhappy and unhealthy;

2. it arises from believing that another’s advantage is unfair and beyond our control to change;

3. sadly for us, it is an increasingly prevalent reaction.

Cultural traditions and some empirical work support Brooks’ first point about the ill effects of envy on well being. But research by Dutch psychologists Niels van de Ven and others confirm a very important distinction between two types of envy: benign and malicious. They show that benign envy is not fun but it leads to a healthy, “moving-up motivation” while malicious envy is hostile and leads to an unhealthy“pulling-down motivation.” It is only the latter type that Brooks likely has in mind.

www.mainstreammentalhealth.org

www.goldmanmccormick.com

Join Dr. Kristina Hallett and Kristin Walker with their guest Dr. Rick Hanson to talk about resilience.

About Dr. Rick Hanson

I am a psychologist, author, teacher, and senior fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times bestselling author. I write and teach about the essential inner skills of personal well-being, psychological growth, and contemplative practice – as well as about relationships, family life, and raising children.

www.rickhanson.net

 

Mental Health Perspectives with Dr. John Huber & Kristin Sunata Walker

Poor envy. It has such a bad reputation.

Who among us enjoys looking miserable, mediocre, hostile — and petty, just because we see someone who has something that we desire?

Lately, envy is in the air, as our country struggles with how to react to the increasing concentration of wealth in a smaller percentage of the population.

In a recent opinion piece, Arthur Brooks, President of the American Enterprise Institute, offers a provocative take on envy’s role in our reactions.

His main points are that:

1. envy makes us unhappy and unhealthy;

2. it arises from believing that another’s advantage is unfair and beyond our control to change;

3. sadly for us, it is an increasingly prevalent reaction.

Cultural traditions and some empirical work support Brooks’ first point about the ill effects of envy on well being. But research by Dutch psychologists Niels van de Ven and others confirm a very important distinction between two types of envy: benign and malicious. They show that benign envy is not fun but it leads to a healthy, “moving-up motivation” while malicious envy is hostile and leads to an unhealthy“pulling-down motivation.” It is only the latter type that Brooks likely has in mind.

Mental Health Perspectives with Dr. John Huber & Kristin Sunata Walker

Brutal Arctic Blast Overtakes Eastern US With Wind Chill Falling To -30 Degrees In Some Areas – How To Manage Seasonal Affective Disorder This Winter

Lack of sunlight and bitter cold temperatures over a prolonged period of time can cause Seasonal Affective Disorder. When our bodies are discomfort, it impacts our mental state of well beading. This disorder can be challenging for some especially those who already have depression tendencies.

There are a number of ways to treat the symptoms of SAD and one of them to find ways to appreciate the good things about winter. If cast off winter, that’s 25% of the year that you’re pledging to be less than happy.

If winter is forcing you to be indoors more often – you can utilize that time to organize & do administrative work on your home. You can also use this time to catch up on your favorite TV series. Because of what you’re doing with your time now, you’ll be able to experience more outdoor activities in the Spring & Summer.

Mental Health Perspectives with Dr. John Huber & Kristin Sunata Walker

‘Seinfeld’ Is The Latest TV Classic To Offend Millennials Over Jokes About ‘Soup Nazi,’ Same-Sex Relationships

Critics are slamming the popular sitcom Seinfeld as offensive, calling many of its jokes tone-deaf and distasteful. Some points of controversy include using offensive slurs like Nazi and Indian Giver or racist jokes against people who can’t speak English and poking fun at homosexuals. The controversy follows attacks on other long-running shows like Friends and All In The Family.

STORY LINK: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6555895/Seinfeld-latest-TV-classic-offend-millennials-racist-jokes.html

What we are experiencing is the raw and unstoppable force of mass communication via social media and the internet. If I watched a rerun of All In The Family with Archie Bunker today, I’d be appalled. But when I watched this show as a child it was considered funny and edgy. What I didn’t have at my fingertips was a smartphone.

Every generation has an evolution, thankfully, of some kind but none prior to the Millennial generation had a place where their voices could be heard en masse. Is some of what was considered okay on Seinfeld appropriate for today’s awareness and culture? Absolutely not. In the past these kinds of discussions would be held in ethics class on popular television shows at a university. It would be studied like history – our past has always been studied. Just as Seinfeld is not appropriate for today’s day and age – neither are the old ways of expressing our outrage. Everyone can be heard today that has a smartphone in hand and available internet. This is a whole new era for all of us.

Is this wrong? Has the pendulum swung too far? Are we getting too politically correct? Obviously not. The people are speaking. But is a show like Seinfeld currently in production today with new shows? No – it wouldn’t be relevant. Should it be available to be watched today on Netflix or anywhere else with content that was a reflection of our evolution at the time it was on the air? Let’s ask ourselves if censorship is a good idea for any person or country.

It’s okay to be offended at what was considered appropriate in the past. This is part of how we learn and grow as human beings. Should we punish the actors, creators, generation that liked Seinfeld and feel it is a beloved part of their experience? I don’t think so. Be compassionate about what people of a generation before you had to tolerate because it was culturally appropriate and didn’t have the benefit of a platform to complain like social media. And then – create new and positive content that is a reflection of today.”

Mental Health Perspectives with Dr. John Huber & Kristin Sunata Walker

Patriots Win Super Bowl: What Is The Psychology Behind A Championship Team?

The Super Bowl win over the Rams makes the Patriots the greatest franchise in league history, pushing them well ahead of the Steelers, whose last Super Bowl victory came 10 years ago, and who won the majority of their Super Bowls way back in the 1970s. The Patriots have won all of their Super Bowls in the last 18 years, with Brady being the face of the franchise ever since 2001. Since then they’ve gone to an astounding nine Super Bowls, all during a time when free agency and salary caps were supposed to make this type of run impossible.

What are some of the mental qualities that championship teams often have?

Who would you consider to be some of the all-time greatest leaders in professional sports?

Do you think that individuals and teams that dare to achieve greatness could be considered slightly mentally unbalanced because logically speaking, attaining greatness often means defying the odds at every conceivable measure?

Hypothetically speaking, what would you consider to be a mentally tougher team: one that always finds a way to win games or one that manages to remain competitive despite taking humiliating losses?

What some of the advantages that playing competitive sports can give an individual in the workplace?

Join Beyond Risk and Back for shows at Psychotherapy Associates Winter Symposium.

Hover over any of the images below for the show title and subject matter.

Also available on iTunes.

 

 

Addictive Disorders, Behavioral Health, and Mental Health

Join us in celebrating over 45 years of exemplary service to the Addictive Disorders, Behavioral Health and Mental Health Fields! The purpose of the Annual Winter Symposium includes improving health professional attendee’s evidence-based diagnostic/assessment, treatment, knowledge and practice skills specific to reducing and/or eliminating health care provider care gaps and facilitating integrative care related to a broad spectrum of addictive disorders, behavioral health and mental health disorders.

www.cspaws.com

Join Dr. Kristina Hallett and Kristin Walker with their guest Stephanie B. McAuliffe to discuss her book and her work. We do many shows about addiction and recovery. Not enough, however, about the partners of those in recovery. On this Be Awesome series episode we take a deep dive into the work that goes into recovery for those of us who have lived with an alcoholic.

About Stephanie B. McAuliffe

I am a truth-seeker and personal archaeologist. Just before Hurricane Sandy, my world was turned upside down when my husband entered rehab for alcoholism.

I knows firsthand what life is like living with the chaos of this disease and how deeply it affects families, often many generations back. I use my expertise in identifying and putting together the pieces of the puzzle to understand our intricate ties. Our families shape our identity, yet we are not our stories.

I believe there is power in giving a voice to our stories and more importantly in understanding the “why” behind them. I believe there should be no shame in giving them a voice and am living proof that in voicing them we can finally let them go.

I am guided by my values of honesty, integrity, truth and love. My path now leads me to one of being of service. I seek to help people uncover and tell their truth, and to connect on a different level. I am a living example that we can heal and clear the energy passed from prior generations, break the cycle, and in the process uncover the greatness of who we are meant to be.

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