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Communal Narcissism with Dr. Paul Meier I

Join Dr. Paul Meier and Kristin as they discuss communal narcissism and its impact on all of us.

DEFINITION: According to this model, communal narcissism may be understood as an agency-communion characteristic; that is, communal narcissists’ agentic core motives (i.e., grandiosity, esteem, entitlement, and power) are expressed through communal means (e.g., helpfulness and trustworthiness).

Narcissism Test: https://rb.gy/mcrn36

Just the Way You Are with Dr. Paul Wichansky

Kristin interviews Dr. Paul Wichansky with Mental Health News Radio Network’s film producing partner, Chas for an incredible story of resilience, positive attitude, and inspiration.

Dr. Wichansky has never let his attitude become a disability. He was born with cerebral palsy and have a hearing loss. He is an author, speaker, meteorologist, and humanitarian. He has worked hard
to transform obstacles into opportunities for self-improvement, and host inspirational programs designed to show his audiences, by example, how they can also do the same.

He is a motivational speaker who hosts programs that inspire confidence, growth, and opportunity. Topics include disability awareness, diversity, anti-bullying, overcoming adversity, and optimism and resilience.

The NJ Senate honored him with a proclamation for sharing his story with over a million children and teens, parents, educators, and other professionals during an inspiring 40-year speaking career nationwide.

An inspiration to many, you can find out more about him at www.justthewayyouare.com.

CoVid Collateral Damage, Students Mental Health and Suicide Risk

Join Dr. Lisa Day and The Mental Health Comedian, Frank King, for a discussion about suicide and teens during the pandemic.

1. What are Pre-Covid incidents of students Mental Health Challenges and Suicide
Risk? Has this increased since CoVid?

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2. What are the contributors to the increased stress on student mental health and suicidal
ideation?

3. What impact has CoVid had on students’ access to mental health services?

4. In what ways has technology contributed to monitoring student’s mental health?

5. How do we know if our children are struggling with suicidal thoughts?

6. How do we know if our children are struggling with suicidal thoughts?

7. What can families do to support students during this time? What do we say if we believe
our children are having suicidal thoughts?

8. How can we keep students healthy in the Digital World of Social Distancing?

9. How can we help our kids with adaptation and resilience?

10. How can we support our kids with re-integration?

11. How can we address the development of dysfunctional coping patterns that may have
emerged?

12. What can we do to keep ourselves healthy to support the children in these
unprecedented times?

Anniversary Emotions and Illnesses Part 2 with Dr. Paul Meier

Join Dr. Paul Meier and Kristin for the second episode of anniversary emotions.

Notes from Dr. Paul Meier: NORMAL BRIEF GRIEF.

My father died many years ago and I was with him when he died talking to him and it was a wonderful experience even though sad to lose him. I have dealt with it well I believe. One Christmas Day a few years after his death, I was excited to go wake up our young kids to open presents and have an exciting day together, but then I felt suddenly sad for no apparent reason and couldn’t figure out why. I went into a room by myself and prayed for insight and immediately became aware that my parents always came at Christmas mornings to open presents with us. My Mom was still alive and would be there soon, but my Dad wouldn’t and I missed him. I actually encouraged myself to cry and did so for about two minutes and prayed that God would send an angel to give him a hug up in heaven and tell him we love him and miss him today. God would never say no to a request like that. Then I felt great again, having become aware of the reason and dealt with it. Feeling temporary brief dysthymia is not always a bad thing. It was a good thing in that circumstance and it might be for you in our listening family too.

REGRESSION = Lots of my clients who I have seen for med checks but brief therapy once every few months for 10-15 years have done great that long, but we all still have a tendency to REGRESS to some extent to seeing life and ourselves and our roles like we saw them in childhood when we visit parents and sibs on the holidays or other events (weddings, etc.) and then are surprised we may feel worse temporarily after the holiday and not even know why. I warn my clients as I see them in Nov and Dec to watch out for that and I explain this to them. That way they catch themselves and avoid it, or sometimes need to avoid obnoxious parents who are always verbally abusive. To feel guilty for staying out of contact or limiting contact with chronically abusive parents is false guilt. We should feel guilty if we subject ourselves and our families to that instead. “Honoring your father and mother” in the Bible doesn’t mean letting them dominate or abuse you. It might mean having no contact with them but pitching in financially with other sibs to help pay for a nursing home when they are old, or it may involve doing nothing but avoiding or assisting them altogether.
PTSD SYMPTOMS MAY OCCUR ANNUALLY EVEN WHEN GONE THE REST OF THE TIME. If there is a past traumatic event of any kind or even strong regret that has not been adequately dealt with, each year near that anniversary date any person might experience more anxiety and sadness and not know why. Even nightmares that are difficult to understand, or more sensitivity. A person MIGHT be aware of what it is and feel bad each year or MIGHT NOT even be aware of what it is. For example, people who believe abortion is OK for personal reasons often feel sad annually at the time it occurred, often unconsciously, and may even look around at kids of the age that child would be had he or she been born and have conscious or unconscious regrets or guilt feelings. This is part of what is known psychiatrically as POST-ABORTION SYNDROME.

UNRESOLVED GRIEF. Anniversaries of major losses, like death of a child or significant other. Broken relationships. Divorce is often more traumatic than the death of a beloved mate. It is a rude awakening that the mate was not who you thought he or she really was. It is a willful rejection of you rather than an unexpected death.

Anniversary Illnesses and Emotions Part I with Dr. Paul Meier

Join Dr. Paul and Kristin Walker talking about how certain times in our life that are stressful can show up later on. Dates of stressful events can leave us feeling a lot of anxiety and we don’t necessarily understand why. Episode 1 of 2!

Notes from Dr. Paul Meier: NORMAL BRIEF GRIEF.

My father died many years ago and I was with him when he died talking to him and it was a wonderful experience even though sad to lose him. I have dealt with it well I believe. One Christmas Day a few years after his death, I was excited to go wake up our young kids to open presents and have an exciting day together, but then I felt suddenly sad for no apparent reason and couldn’t figure out why. I went into a room by myself and prayed for insight and immediately became aware that my parents always came at Christmas mornings to open presents with us. My Mom was still alive and would be there soon, but my Dad wouldn’t and I missed him. I actually encouraged myself to cry and did so for about two minutes and prayed that God would send an angel to give him a hug up in heaven and tell him we love him and miss him today. God would never say no to a request like that. Then I felt great again, having become aware of the reason and dealt with it. Feeling temporary brief dysthymia is not always a bad thing. It was a good thing in that circumstance and it might be for you in our listening family too.

REGRESSION = Lots of my clients who I have seen for med checks but brief therapy once every few months for 10-15 years have done great that long, but we all still have a tendency to REGRESS to some extent to seeing life and ourselves and our roles like we saw them in childhood when we visit parents and sibs on the holidays or other events (weddings, etc.) and then are surprised we may feel worse temporarily after the holiday and not even know why. I warn my clients as I see them in Nov and Dec to watch out for that and I explain this to them. That way they catch themselves and avoid it, or sometimes need to avoid obnoxious parents who are always verbally abusive. To feel guilty for staying out of contact or limiting contact with chronically abusive parents is false guilt. We should feel guilty if we subject ourselves and our families to that instead. “Honoring your father and mother” in the Bible doesn’t mean letting them dominate or abuse you. It might mean having no contact with them but pitching in financially with other sibs to help pay for a nursing home when they are old, or it may involve doing nothing but avoiding or assisting them altogether.
PTSD SYMPTOMS MAY OCCUR ANNUALLY EVEN WHEN GONE THE REST OF THE TIME. If there is a past traumatic event of any kind or even strong regret that has not been adequately dealt with, each year near that anniversary date any person might experience more anxiety and sadness and not know why. Even nightmares that are difficult to understand, or more sensitivity. A person MIGHT be aware of what it is and feel bad each year or MIGHT NOT even be aware of what it is. For example, people who believe abortion is OK for personal reasons often feel sad annually at the time it occurred, often unconsciously, and may even look around at kids of the age that child would be had he or she been born and have conscious or unconscious regrets or guilt feelings. This is part of what is known psychiatrically as POST-ABORTION SYNDROME.

UNRESOLVED GRIEF. Anniversaries of major losses, like death of a child or significant other. Broken relationships. Divorce is often more traumatic than the death of a beloved mate. It is a rude awakening that the mate was not who you thought he or she really was. It is a willful rejection of you rather than an unexpected death.

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