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Tag: counseling

And You May Find Yourself: A Guided Practice To Never Fearing Death Again

In this powerful podcast, we talk with Gerry Murphy, author of And You May Find Yourself: A Guided Practice To Never Fearing Death Again. Gerry’s near-death experience, where he felt as though he was “signing his life away”, forever changed the way he lives. Gerry encourages everyone to “practice” death, meaning that if we stop to truly think about our ending, we might find the urgency in changing the way we live. In doing this, he believes we are all given a second chance to create the life and legacy we want. This podcast is particularly relevant in today’s uncertain world and listening to Gerry’s accent is a bonus!

Gerry is from Scotland but lives in New York and runs Pentalogy Marketing https://www.pentalogymarketing.com/ His book can be found on his website, at Barnes and Noble, and on amazon https://www.amazon.com/You-May-Find-Yourself-Practice/dp/1734837608

Transcend PTSD with Dr. Dan Smith, Kristin Walker, and Mary Shapiro

The Transcend App for self-help from PTSD/trauma has launched!
Dr. Dan Smith and Mary Shapiro were central in the development of the National Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center’s Transcend App. D.r Dan Smith, Mary Shapiro, Kristin Walker, and I as we talk about the app, PTSD, self-help, and how to navigate through these troubling times.
Dr. Smith is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). A Fellow of the Association for Behavioral & Cognitive Therapies, (ABCT), Dr. Smith is a nationally certified provider of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TFCBT) and an approved TF-CBT trainer. He specializes in the use of technology to disseminate trauma-related information for clinical and non-clinical professionals.
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/transcend-nmvc/id1504741131
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=edu.musc.dhs.transcend

Kristin Walker is the founder of the Mental Health News Radio Network.

Mary Shapiro: Postdoctoral Fellow Medical University of South worked on the Transcend app project.

CoVid Collateral Damage, Students Mental Health and Suicide Risk

Join Dr. Lisa Day and The Mental Health Comedian, Frank King, for a discussion about suicide and teens during the pandemic.

1. What are Pre-Covid incidents of students Mental Health Challenges and Suicide
Risk? Has this increased since CoVid?

www.meierclinics.com
www.thementalhealthcomedian.com

2. What are the contributors to the increased stress on student mental health and suicidal
ideation?

3. What impact has CoVid had on students’ access to mental health services?

4. In what ways has technology contributed to monitoring student’s mental health?

5. How do we know if our children are struggling with suicidal thoughts?

6. How do we know if our children are struggling with suicidal thoughts?

7. What can families do to support students during this time? What do we say if we believe
our children are having suicidal thoughts?

8. How can we keep students healthy in the Digital World of Social Distancing?

9. How can we help our kids with adaptation and resilience?

10. How can we support our kids with re-integration?

11. How can we address the development of dysfunctional coping patterns that may have
emerged?

12. What can we do to keep ourselves healthy to support the children in these
unprecedented times?

Medicating Normal – The intersection between human suffering and profit-driven medicine

You do NOT want to miss one of the most powerful interviews we have done! Medicating Normal is a documentary film that explores the untold story of what happens when profit-driven medicine intersects with human suffering.

In this podcast, Director Lynn Cunningham discusses her hope that Medicating Normal will present one very important and predominantly untold story. Her mission is that, as a society, we can begin a meaningful, informed, nationwide discussion about what it means to be fully human and mentally well.

Angela Peacock, MSW, former U.S. Army Sergeant, and subject of the film, Medicating Normal is a mental health advocate, a writer, and a YouTube creator who travels in her RV across the United States in an effort to improve the mental health care system and bring voice to patients who have been harmed by it.

Medicating Normal focuses on the predicament of 5 individuals whose lives were profoundly impacted by the medication they were taking. This group – individuals facing trauma and stress were drugged needlessly and made sicker as a result. Understanding the harm that had befallen them – especially in the context of the misleading science and marketing behind these drugs – compelled Lynn, her Co-Director, Wendy and their team to make this groundbreaking film.

For more information and community screenings of the film, go to medicatingnormal.com

Anniversary Emotions and Illnesses Part 2 with Dr. Paul Meier

Join Dr. Paul Meier and Kristin for the second episode of anniversary emotions.

Notes from Dr. Paul Meier: NORMAL BRIEF GRIEF.

My father died many years ago and I was with him when he died talking to him and it was a wonderful experience even though sad to lose him. I have dealt with it well I believe. One Christmas Day a few years after his death, I was excited to go wake up our young kids to open presents and have an exciting day together, but then I felt suddenly sad for no apparent reason and couldn’t figure out why. I went into a room by myself and prayed for insight and immediately became aware that my parents always came at Christmas mornings to open presents with us. My Mom was still alive and would be there soon, but my Dad wouldn’t and I missed him. I actually encouraged myself to cry and did so for about two minutes and prayed that God would send an angel to give him a hug up in heaven and tell him we love him and miss him today. God would never say no to a request like that. Then I felt great again, having become aware of the reason and dealt with it. Feeling temporary brief dysthymia is not always a bad thing. It was a good thing in that circumstance and it might be for you in our listening family too.

REGRESSION = Lots of my clients who I have seen for med checks but brief therapy once every few months for 10-15 years have done great that long, but we all still have a tendency to REGRESS to some extent to seeing life and ourselves and our roles like we saw them in childhood when we visit parents and sibs on the holidays or other events (weddings, etc.) and then are surprised we may feel worse temporarily after the holiday and not even know why. I warn my clients as I see them in Nov and Dec to watch out for that and I explain this to them. That way they catch themselves and avoid it, or sometimes need to avoid obnoxious parents who are always verbally abusive. To feel guilty for staying out of contact or limiting contact with chronically abusive parents is false guilt. We should feel guilty if we subject ourselves and our families to that instead. “Honoring your father and mother” in the Bible doesn’t mean letting them dominate or abuse you. It might mean having no contact with them but pitching in financially with other sibs to help pay for a nursing home when they are old, or it may involve doing nothing but avoiding or assisting them altogether.
PTSD SYMPTOMS MAY OCCUR ANNUALLY EVEN WHEN GONE THE REST OF THE TIME. If there is a past traumatic event of any kind or even strong regret that has not been adequately dealt with, each year near that anniversary date any person might experience more anxiety and sadness and not know why. Even nightmares that are difficult to understand, or more sensitivity. A person MIGHT be aware of what it is and feel bad each year or MIGHT NOT even be aware of what it is. For example, people who believe abortion is OK for personal reasons often feel sad annually at the time it occurred, often unconsciously, and may even look around at kids of the age that child would be had he or she been born and have conscious or unconscious regrets or guilt feelings. This is part of what is known psychiatrically as POST-ABORTION SYNDROME.

UNRESOLVED GRIEF. Anniversaries of major losses, like death of a child or significant other. Broken relationships. Divorce is often more traumatic than the death of a beloved mate. It is a rude awakening that the mate was not who you thought he or she really was. It is a willful rejection of you rather than an unexpected death.

Anniversary Illnesses and Emotions Part I with Dr. Paul Meier

Join Dr. Paul and Kristin Walker talking about how certain times in our life that are stressful can show up later on. Dates of stressful events can leave us feeling a lot of anxiety and we don’t necessarily understand why. Episode 1 of 2!

Notes from Dr. Paul Meier: NORMAL BRIEF GRIEF.

My father died many years ago and I was with him when he died talking to him and it was a wonderful experience even though sad to lose him. I have dealt with it well I believe. One Christmas Day a few years after his death, I was excited to go wake up our young kids to open presents and have an exciting day together, but then I felt suddenly sad for no apparent reason and couldn’t figure out why. I went into a room by myself and prayed for insight and immediately became aware that my parents always came at Christmas mornings to open presents with us. My Mom was still alive and would be there soon, but my Dad wouldn’t and I missed him. I actually encouraged myself to cry and did so for about two minutes and prayed that God would send an angel to give him a hug up in heaven and tell him we love him and miss him today. God would never say no to a request like that. Then I felt great again, having become aware of the reason and dealt with it. Feeling temporary brief dysthymia is not always a bad thing. It was a good thing in that circumstance and it might be for you in our listening family too.

REGRESSION = Lots of my clients who I have seen for med checks but brief therapy once every few months for 10-15 years have done great that long, but we all still have a tendency to REGRESS to some extent to seeing life and ourselves and our roles like we saw them in childhood when we visit parents and sibs on the holidays or other events (weddings, etc.) and then are surprised we may feel worse temporarily after the holiday and not even know why. I warn my clients as I see them in Nov and Dec to watch out for that and I explain this to them. That way they catch themselves and avoid it, or sometimes need to avoid obnoxious parents who are always verbally abusive. To feel guilty for staying out of contact or limiting contact with chronically abusive parents is false guilt. We should feel guilty if we subject ourselves and our families to that instead. “Honoring your father and mother” in the Bible doesn’t mean letting them dominate or abuse you. It might mean having no contact with them but pitching in financially with other sibs to help pay for a nursing home when they are old, or it may involve doing nothing but avoiding or assisting them altogether.
PTSD SYMPTOMS MAY OCCUR ANNUALLY EVEN WHEN GONE THE REST OF THE TIME. If there is a past traumatic event of any kind or even strong regret that has not been adequately dealt with, each year near that anniversary date any person might experience more anxiety and sadness and not know why. Even nightmares that are difficult to understand, or more sensitivity. A person MIGHT be aware of what it is and feel bad each year or MIGHT NOT even be aware of what it is. For example, people who believe abortion is OK for personal reasons often feel sad annually at the time it occurred, often unconsciously, and may even look around at kids of the age that child would be had he or she been born and have conscious or unconscious regrets or guilt feelings. This is part of what is known psychiatrically as POST-ABORTION SYNDROME.

UNRESOLVED GRIEF. Anniversaries of major losses, like death of a child or significant other. Broken relationships. Divorce is often more traumatic than the death of a beloved mate. It is a rude awakening that the mate was not who you thought he or she really was. It is a willful rejection of you rather than an unexpected death.

“Hindsight” – Seeing Clearly Through the Veil of Deception

Join us for a riveting talk with Rhonda Madge, author of the book Hindsight: Seeing Clearly Through the Veil of Deception. In this podcast, Rhonda delves into the murder of her father at the vulnerable age of 17. Trying to cope with the death of such an important figure in her young life set in motion a downward chain of events. Rhonda describes living in “darkness for 20 years” where she started believing in “whispered lies”, never really dealing with the grief of her father’s death. She takes us through that journey and how she ended up on the other side.

Rhonda is an author, speaker and blogger and can be found at: https://rhondamadge.com/. Her book is a must read!

Hope and Grief with Dr. Fatima Ali Haider

In this very special conversation, Dr. Fatima Ali Haider shares about her personal tragedy and how it led her to start an organization to create a space for women and mothers to grieve in Pakistan. The toll of terrorism in clear and the impact of trauma cuts across cultures. This heartwarming conversation is further proof that the worldwide need for understanding trauma and creating access to mental health services is necessary. Listening to this brave and incredible woman will leave you inspired.

Fatima Ali Haider, a medical doctor and EMDR therapist by training, lost her husband and son in an incident of sectarian terrorism in 2013. Her personal experience and journey after the tragedy made her aware of those suffering in similar situations. Therefore, she co-founded an initiative in 2015 called ‘The Grief Directory’ that was intended to be a bridge of compassion between victims of terrorism in Pakistan who require support and individuals willing to offer it. Through this platform, she has reached out to countless victims of terrorism and their families across the boundaries of religion, sect or ethnicity, providing assistance in areas of health, education and emotional support. Other than directly working with the victims, Dr. Fatima has been conducting youth internship programmes from The Grief Directory’s platform for the last five years, training young college students on empathy, tolerance, acceptance, and resilience through in person meetings with victims and diversity tours. The programme has been well attended by young students, many of them women. In an effort towards countering terrorism and violent extremism in Pakistan, she regularly advocates for the rights of victims of terrorism in Pakistan including establishment of institutionalized mechanisms of support and state ownership on various platforms.
Dr. Fatima recently completed her master’s in Peace and Conflict from the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, and is now undertaking her Ph.D. there. She hopes to bring valuable lessons home to support those who have been marginalized due to religion, sect, and acts of violence.

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